To the hanten, let's add a front panel, called an okumi, to make it easier to wrap and add a touch of modesty. If it is long, we have a yukata (lit. hot-water-wear, normally sewn in a light weight cotton) or a kosode (in silk, heavier cotton and other fibers).
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yukata are never fully lined
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kosode may, or may not,  be fully lined
If it is short, we have a michiyuki (lit. street-go), which most often snaps or buttons closed. If ties are visible it may be called a  dochuugi (lit. middle-body-wear), a hifu (lit. body-cloth), or a hippari (lit. a pull). Add pants and you have a samue  (lit. make-work-clothes), as seen below.
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Isn't this fun?
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Let's go back to the basic kimono shape and play around a little.
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If the garment is unlined it is called a hitoe (lit. one layer), if it is lined, it is sometimes called a futae (lit. two layer).
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Now lengthen the hem of the kimono and you have a susohiki. Susohiki (lit. pull-hem) and hikizuri (lit. pull-drag) are normally padded at the bottom, but since this example is also a hitoe, it remains a single layer (unpadded). Susokiki and hikizuri are designed to be worn closed in front (overlapped and tied with an obi) just as you would a kosode or similar kimono.

Uchikake (lit. plop-on-top) are similar in shape to susohiki. However, they are designed to be worn open, on top of a kimono tied with an obi. Uchikake are not belted. With this in mind, uchikake will often have much heavier padding at the hem, and are often sewn from relatively thick, stiff fabric.
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michiyuki may have a wide range of neck lines
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